Interracial marriage in alabama


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However, what does not end in a divorce court hearing, does not resolve the race question. In the United States, marriage and interracial marriage is a legal sacrament. In the United States itself, marriage and interracial marriage are not. The federal courts, at trial, are supposed to have equal jurisdiction over this matter. However, in many places, a state court judge does not have authority in deciding whether to enforce the federal statutory provisions against state officials using their power or the constitutional right to the equal protection of the laws as construed by the statute. The Supreme Court, in its opinion in the case Mather v. Commonwealth , held that, under the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment, the states have the power to decide any question whether the constitutionality of state ordinances against persons of the opposite sex is within their power or their constitutional right. Accordingly, they have no power to compel the state to provide an equal protection remedy. But it is not so. In Mather , the Supreme Court held that, in a state statute, the state may not requisition for public accommodation any person to discriminate against a gay or lesbian community and that the state's religious exemption for public accommodations is not a limitation on its ability to use federal laws in enforcing the law that are contrary to the public interest.

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